This website uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some of these cookies are used for visitor analysis, others are essential to making our site function properly and improve the user experience. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Click Accept to consent and dismiss this message or Deny to leave this website. Read our Privacy Statement for more.
Join CSTE   |   Career Center   |   Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Report Abuse   |   Sign In
CSTE Features
Blog Home All Blogs

2017 Plenary Speakers & Mann Memorial Lecturer

Posted By CSTE Staff, Friday, May 12, 2017
Updated: Thursday, May 11, 2017
CSTE is pleased to announce an exciting lineup of speakers at this year’s annual conference in Boise, Idaho with diverse professional backgrounds and insightful presentations to share. Our 2017 speakers will share their perspectives on applied public health epidemiology, with a focus on the 2017 conference theme - “Cultivating an Environment for Better Health.”

Keiji Fukuda , MD, MPH– Jonathan M. Mann Memorial Lecture

Keiji Fukuda is the Director and a Clinical Professor at the University of Hong Kong School of Public Health. He previously worked at the World Health Organization (WHO) in several capacities including Assistant Director-General (ADG) and Special Representative of the Director-General for antimicrobial resistance; ADG for the Health Security and Environment Cluster; and Director of the Global Influenza Programme. Before that, he worked at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as the Epidemiology Section Chief, Influenza Branch and as a Medical Epidemiologist in the Viral Exanthems and Herpesvirus Branch, National Center for Infectious Diseases. Professor Fukuda has been a global public health leader in many areas including health security; emerging infectious diseases including seasonal, avian and pandemic influenza, SARS, MERS and Ebola; antimicrobial resistance; development of the Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework; implementation of the International Health Regulations; food safety; and chronic fatigue syndrome. He has considerable experience in epidemiological research and field investigations, media communications and international diplomatic negotiations including those held to establish a historic Heads of State level meeting on antimicrobial resistance at the United Nations in 2016. He has a BA in Biology, an MD; an MPH; was trained in the Epidemic Intelligence Service at CDC and is certified in internal medicine by the American Board of Internal Medicine.

Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW

Caleb Banta-Green is a Principal Research Scientist at the Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute, an Affiliate Associate Professor at the School of Public Health and Affiliate Faculty at the Harborview Injury Prevention & Research Center at the University of Washington. He conducts research and provides community and professional technical assistance on opioid use disorder treatment and opioid overdose interventions. He is currently analyzing data from an NIH funded clinical trial on opioid overdose prevention and has recently started at clinical trial to test an opioid use disorder treatment intervention for those released from prison. He is evaluating a HHS SAMHSA funded community based overdose prevention intervention and working with the Washington Department of Health on developing opioid overdose surveillance systems. He has been the Seattle representative to the NIH NIDA drug epidemiology workgroup since 2001. In 2012, he served as the Senior Science Advisory in the White House drug policy office working on opioid overdose prevention.

CAPT. Martin (Marty) Cetron, MD

Dr. Cetron is director of the Division of Global Migration and Quarantine (DGMQ) at the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID). He previously served as director of DGMQ when it was within the National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases. DGMQ’s mission is to prevent the introduction and spread of infectious diseases into the U.S. and to prevent morbidity and mortality among immigrants, refugees, migrant workers and international travelers. Dr. Cetron’s primary research interest is international health and global migration with a focus on emerging infections, tropical diseases and vaccine-preventable diseases in mobile populations.

Since coming to CDC in 1992, Dr. Cetron he has led a number of domestic and international outbreak investigations, conducted epidemiologic research and been involved in domestic and international emergency responses to provide medical screening and disease prevention programs to refugees prior to U.S. resettlement. He played a leadership role in CDC responses to intentional and naturally acquired emerging infectious disease outbreaks, including the anthrax bioterrorism incident, the global SARS epidemic, the U.S. monkeypox outbreak and the H1N1 pandemic. Dr. Cetron is also part of CDC’s Pandemic Influenza Planning and Preparedness Team. He holds faculty appointments in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Emory University School of Medicine and the Department of Epidemiology at Rollins School of Public Health.

Dr. Cetron received his bachelor of arts degree from Dartmouth College in 1981 and his MD from Tufts University in 1985. He trained in internal medicine at the University of Virginia and infectious diseases at the University of Washington before becoming a commissioned officer in the U.S. Public Health Service in 1992.


Jacqueline MacDonald Gibson, PhD, MS

Dr. Gibson is currently an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She had a 13-year career working for public policy research institutions before returning to school to earn a dual Ph.D. and entering academia.

As a senior engineer at the nonprofit RAND Corp., she served as liaison to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and conducted technical reviews of risk assessment methods adopted by government agencies. As associate director of the Water Science and Technology Board of the National Research Council, which advises Congress and the federal government on science policy matters, Dr. Gibson led a range of studies of issues at the interface between water science and public policy.

Studies included assessment of options for improving potable water service to small U.S. communities, evaluation of regulatory requirements for the remediation of contaminated groundwater, and assessment of research priorities for new environmental remediation technologies. She has also given briefings on these and other topics to a variety of federal officials, members of Congress and their staffs, and institutional advisory boards.


Christine Hahn, MD

Christine Hahn, MD, known for her common-sense approach to often challenging situations, has wanted to help as many people as possible since she finished her training as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1995. She realized then she enjoys helping people live healthier lives now, as well as in the future. That led her to accept the position as Idaho’s state epidemiologist in 1996, and she continues to be the go-to authority for an array of healthcare professionals in the state, as well as the state’s public health districts. Her favorite part of the job is being able to help busy medical providers get the tools they need so they and their patients are successful. Her work overseeing the Idaho Refugee Health Screening Program has helped to provide better coordination and standardization of screening processes between clinics throughout the state in the last two years. She also has been instrumental in aligning Idaho’s immunization requirements with the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, meaning that more children are starting school with the recommended panel of vaccines. As the state’s tuberculosis controller, she has advised and supported physicians treating and managing the disease.

Hahn attended Medical School at Michigan State University and completed a residency in Internal Medicine at the Mayo Clinic’s Graduate School of Medicine. She then completed a Fellowship in Infectious Diseases at Duke University Medical Center. After a two-year training program as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer with the CDC, she became the Idaho state epidemiologist. Hahn served on the CDC’s Advisory Committee for the Elimination of Tuberculosis until June 2012. She was recently named the Medical Director for the Division of Public Health with oversight of the Bureau of Communicable Disease Prevention and the Idaho Bureau of Laboratories. She served as president of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists from 2004-2005, and remains active in that organization. She is the organization’s liaison to the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, which sets national vaccination policy. Locally, Hahn serves on the infection prevention committees of Saint Alphonsus and St. Luke’s regional medical centers in Boise and is on the board of Idaho’s Immunization Policy Commission.


Debra Houry, MD, MPH

Dr. Houry is the Director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) at CDC. In this role, Dr. Houry leads innovative research and science-based programs to prevent injuries and violence and to reduce their consequences. She joined the CDC in October 2014. She has previously served as Vice-Chair and Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and as Associate Professor in the Departments of Behavioral Science and Health Education and in Environmental Health at the Rollins School of Public Health. Dr. Houry also served as an Attending Physician at Emory University Hospital and Grady Memorial Hospital and as the Director of Emory Center for Injury Control. Her prior research has focused on injury and violence prevention in addition to the interface between emergency medicine and public health, and the utility of preventative health interventions and screening for high-risk health behaviors. She has received several national awards for her work in the field of injury and violence prevention.

Dr. Houry received the first Linda Saltzman Memorial Intimate Partner Violence Researcher Award from the Institute on Violence, Abuse, and Trauma and the Academy of Women in Academic Emergency Medicine’s Researcher Award. She is past president of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research and Emory University Senate. Dr. Houry has served on numerous other boards and committees within the field of injury and violence prevention. She has authored more than 90 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters on injury prevention and violence. Dr. Houry received her MD and MPH degrees from Tulane University and completed her residency training in emergency medicine at Denver Health Medical Center.


Lyle R. Petersen, MD, MPH

Dr. Petersen is the director of the Division of Vector-Borne Diseases in the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID). The division, located in Fort Collins, Colorado, supports CDC’s mission to protect the American public from exotic and domestic bacterial and viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks, fleas and other vectors.

Dr. Petersen earned his medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco. His career at CDC began in the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) in 1985. During that time, he completed CDC’s Preventive Medicine Residency Program, received a Master of Public Health degree from Emory University, and served in several posts, including the Chief of the HIV Seroepidemiology Branch. In 1996, Dr. Petersen accepted an assignment in Germany, where he helped guide that country’s efforts in creating a new national infectious disease epidemiology program at the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin. In 2000, he returned to the United States to serve as the Deputy Director of Science of the Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, and he became the division’s Director in 2004.


Continuing Education through CDC

This year, CSTE has partnered with CDC to provide continuing education to Annual Conference attendees. We anticipate offering CE for doctors, nurses, health educators, veterinarians, certified in public health and general practitioners. Approval is pending with more details to come.

 

To learn more, visit www.csteconference.org.

Tags:  Annual Conference  epidemiology  infectious disease 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Strike a Chord at the 2014 CSTE Annual Conference

Posted By Tim Jones, Thursday, June 19, 2014
Untitled Document
I am excited to welcome ‘y'all' to Nashville, Tennessee! In addition to taking advantage of a full and exciting conference agenda, I hope everyone takes time to enjoy the great setting of this year's meeting and the best of Nashville's attractions.

This year, our conference includes speakers, presentations, and discussions on a huge variety of topics, covering the full range of applied epidemiology under our theme, “Strike a Chord: Epi with Impact.” The CSTE Annual Conference is a unique opportunity to see colleagues and meet new ones from around the country, those within your program area and beyond. I encourage you to take advantage of professional development and learning opportunities outside your own “silos” to explore aspects of our field with which you may be less familiar.
New things going on at the conference this year include:
  • Poster rounds: This pilot program gives attendees a way to engage with poster presentations more actively. Moderators will lead poster round sessions, modeled after IDSA, to guide discussion and engage both attendees and presenters.
    (Infectious disease, Occupational health, and Surveillance/Informatics Monday at 12:30 pm; Chronic disease/MCH/Oral health and Environmental health Tuesday at 12:30 pm)
  • Informatics fellowship graduation: In addition to the Applied Epidemiology Fellowship graduation ceremony at the Connections Reception, our Applied Public Health Informatics Fellows will also graduate this year!
    (Connections reception Sunday at 6 pm; tickets required)
  • Rapid fire sessions: New breakout sessions this year allow for more presentations and accepted abstracts. As the name suggests, these presentations move quickly and give attendees the opportunity to hear a greater breadth of topics.
    (Chronic disease/MCH/Oral health Tuesday at 10:30 am; Infectious disease Tuesday and Wednesday at 10:30 am)
  • Deadly Outbreaks book signing and roundtable: Hear from author Alexandra Levitt and book contributors about the outbreak investigations featured in the book and get your copy autographed.
    (Book signing Sunday at 5:30 pm; Roundtable Monday at 1 pm)
Focus on informatics capacity development:
I’m very enthusiastic about the attention informatics has received recently. Thanks to CSTE’s efforts, including many of you, CDC has embraced the call for increased informatics capacity at CDC and in state and local jurisdictions. The Informatics Training In Place Program (ITIPP), the CDC Public Health Informatics Fellowship Program (PHIFP), and the Applied Public Health Informatics Fellowship are all examples of increasing efforts to meet this important need.
The Annual Conference will feature lots of sessions and discussions about informatics, including topics such as increasing data quality, Meaningful Use, ELR, and more.
Thank you to the Planning Committee, the Executive Board, the Bylaws Committee, and National Office staff for your work to drive this year’s conference to be another successful one.
And thank you to all of the attendees, presenters, and moderators for making our conference vibrant!
Don’t forget your name badge, mobile device (so you can download the conference app!), or your dancing shoes for a great conference in Nashville next week. I trust that you will enjoy networking, professional development, and contributing to important initiatives, and all leave feeling enthusiastic about CSTE and the future of applied epidemiology.
Tim Jones, MD
CSTE President

Tags:  Annual Conference  membership 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Welcome and Opening plenary sessions in Nashville

Posted By Sara Ramey, Thursday, April 17, 2014
Monday, June 23, 8:00 am – 10:00 am
The Future is Here
Welcome and Opening plenary sessions featuring

David W. Fleming, M.D., is Director and Health Officer for Public Health - Seattle & King County, a large metropolitan health department with 1431 employees, 48 sites, and a budget of $332 million, serving a resident population of 1.9 million people. Department activities include core prevention programs, environmental health, community oriented primary care, emergency medical services, correctional health services, Public Health preparedness, and community-based public health assessment and practices.

Prior to assuming this role, Dr. Fleming directed the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Global Health Strategies Program. In this capacity, Dr. Fleming was responsible for the creation, development, and oversight of cross-cutting programs targeting diseases and conditions disproportionately affecting the world’s poorest people and countries. He oversaw the Foundation’s portfolios in vaccine-preventable diseases, nutrition, newborn and child health, leadership, emergency relief, and cross-cutting strategies to improve access to health tools in developing countries.

Dr. Fleming has also served as the Deputy Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). While at CDC, Dr. Fleming led efforts to develop the agency’s scientific and programmatic capabilities, and served as the principal source of scientific and programmatic expertise in CDC’s Office of the Director. He provided oversight of CDC’s global health portfolio through its Office of Global Health, and also oversaw the Director’s offices of Minority Health, Women’s Health, and the Associate Director for Science.

Dr. Fleming has published scientific articles on a wide range of public health issues. He has served on a number of Institute of Medicine and federal advisory committees, the Boards of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations and the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition, as President of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists and as the State Epidemiologist of Oregon.

Dr. Fleming received his medical degree from the State University of New York Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse. He is board certified in internal medicine and preventive medicine and serves on the faculty of the departments of public health at both the University of Washington and Oregon Health Sciences University.

J. Lloyd Michener, M.D., (Course Director) is the Professor and Chairman of the Duke Department of Community and Family Medicine, Director of the Duke Center for Community Research, and Clinical Professor in the Duke School of Nursing. He directs a national program for the “Practical Playbook” which facilitates the integration of Primary Care and Public Health, supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Health Resources and Services Administration, and the de Beaumont Foundation. Dr. Michener is a member of the National Quality Forum Population Health Committee, the Council for the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine of the National Institutes of Health, the National Academic Affiliations Advisory Council of the Department of Veterans Affairs, and the North Carolina Institute of Medicine.

Dr. Michener has served on multiple national boards, including the Board of the Association of American Medical Colleges, the National Patient Safety Foundation, and the Association of Departments of Family Medicine. He is also past President of the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research, received the APTR Duncan Clark Award in 2013, is past co-chair of the Community Engagement Steering Committee for the Clinical Translation Science Awards of the NIH and served as a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee that led to the publication of “Primary Care and Public Health: Exploring Integration to Improve Population Health”.

At Duke, Dr. Michener founded the training programs in nutrition and prevention; helps coordinate the institutional chronic disease programs, and oversees the Master’s Program in Clinical Leadership, a joint program of the Schools of Medicine, Nursing, Business, Law, and the Institute of Public Policy. As Chair of the Department, he leads the family medicine, preventive/occupational medicine, community health, informatics, and physician assistant and physical therapy programs.

For additional information on the conference please vist www.csteconference.org.


Tags:  Annual Conference 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Dr. Thomas Farley to give Mann Lecture in Nashville

Posted By Sara Ramey, Wednesday, April 9, 2014
The Jonathan M. Mann Memorial Lecture is made possible annually by the CDC Foundation with proceeds from a generous grant provided by Richard E. Hoffman, MD, MPH, former Colorado state epidemiologist (1986-2001) and CSTE president (1994-1995). In 1999, the lecture was established to honor Dr. Jonathan Mann, who lost his life in the Swissair plane crash off Nova Scotia in 1998. Dr. Mann was an accomplished state epidemiologist who was called the “architect of the global mobilization against AIDS” for his role as the founding director of the World Health Organization’s Global Program on AIDS.

The 2014 Jonathan M. Mann Memorial Lecturer is Thomas A. Farley, M.D., M.P.H. Dr. Farley is the Joan H. Tisch Distinguished Fellow in Public Health Policy at Hunter College of the City University of New York. From May 2009 to January 2014, he was Commissioner of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
During his time as Health Commissioner, he advocated for innovative public health policies in New York City, including making the city’s parks and beaches smoke-free, prohibiting price discounting of cigarettes, raising the legal sales age of tobacco to 21, capping the portion size of sugary drinks sold in restaurants at 16 ounces, and restricting the burning of air-polluting dirty fuels to heat buildings. During Dr. Farley’s time at the agency, the NYC Health Department led the National Salt Reduction Initiative, which has successfully worked with major food companies to reduce sodium levels in food nationwide. Dr. Farley also used mass media to deliver powerful messages to promote health behaviors, including creating the “Pouring On the Pounds” sugary drink ads on subways and televisions, introducing the “Two Drinks Ago” campaign to reduce binge alcohol drinking, and developing a series of hard-hitting ads on the health consequences of smoking.

Before joining the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Agency, Dr. Farley was chair of the Department of Community Health Sciences at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. He received his MD and Master of Public Health degrees from Tulane University.

Trained as a pediatrician, he served in the Centers for Disease Control's Epidemic Intelligence Service and worked for the CDC and the Louisiana Office of Public Health from 1989 to 2000. During that period, Dr. Farley directed programs to control various infectious diseases. He has conducted research and published articles on a wide range of topics, including Legionnaires' disease, prevention of HIV/STDs, infant mortality, and obesity.

Dr. Farley is coauthor of Prescription for a Healthy Nation (Beacon Press) with RAND Senior Scientist Deborah Cohen.

Tags:  Annual Conference 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Association Management Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal